Rasta TimesCHAT ROOMArticles/ArchiveRaceAndHistory RootsWomen Trinicenter
Africa Speaks.com Africa Speaks HomepageAfrica Speaks.comAfrica Speaks.comAfrica Speaks.com
InteractiveLeslie VibesAyanna RootsRas TyehimbaTriniView.comGeneral Forums
*
Home
Help
Login
Register
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 14, 2017, 10:44:26 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
25516 Posts in 9753 Topics by 980 Members Latest Member: - Roots Dawta Most online today: 66 (July 03, 2005, 11:25:30 PM)
+  Africa Speaks Reasoning Forum
|-+  AFRICA AND THE DIASPORA
| |-+  Rwanda
| | |-+  France "should be charged" for Rwanda genocide
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Print
Author Topic: France "should be charged" for Rwanda genocide  (Read 5020 times)
Bantu_Kelani
Service Member
*****
Posts: 2063


WWW
« on: April 09, 2005, 03:36:11 AM »

This post should come to the attention of all the people who condemn continental Africans saying we are the sole cause of the horrors in our countries. Too much truth is kept away from them! But the evidence is there, continental Africans are too poor and too weak to kill themselves in millions like that. Europeans and Americans support and finance the tyrants in Africa, they remain the major cause in the suffering of our peoples!

B.K

********
France "should be charged" for Rwanda genocide

afrol News, 6 April - Rwandan government officials claim that new proof of France's role in the 1994 Rwanda genocide has emerged during the UN's Rwanda court hearings. Not only was France training the genocidal militias prior to the genocide, the French government was even today providing perpetrators of the genocide a refuge. France has earlier been criticised by a European court for not trying genocide suspects.

Aloys Mutabingwa, the Rwandan government's envoy to the UN-backed International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), yesterday made strong statements to the press in Arusha (Tanzania), where the ICTR is based. Mr Mutabingwa said the French government had part of the responsibility for the 1994 genocide and for not letting the ICTR doing its job properly.

The Rwandan envoy was quoted by the French news agency AFP as saying that the ICTR's ten-year investigations had produced "sufficient and credible evidence" to try French government officials. Many witnesses had told the tribunal about French soldiers training the Interahamwe militia of Hutu extremists. It was only because the ICTR wanted to avoid "a diplomatic incident" that French officials had not been charged.

Mr Mutabingwa also repeated the more known allegations that France keeps interfering with justice by providing a shelter for suspected genocide perpetrators. Several main suspects are still said to be at large in France, allegedly under the protection of the Paris government.

These allegations against France are not new. In June last year, the European Court of Human Rights slammed the French judiciary for using unreasonable long time in proceeding against a Rwandan clergyman, who had been charged with genocide compliancy nine years before. The European court found that the French judiciary was not satisfying the 'reasonable time' requirement" in the European Convention on Human Rights.

Also international human rights groups have criticised France for its seeming unwillingness to contribute to justice for Rwanda's genocide victims. The Paris-based International Federation for Human Rights (FIDH) claims that cases related to the Rwandan genocide had in general been met by "a certain coolness by French judiciary authorities."

France, which supported Rwanda's Hutu government in power when the genocide started, has kept a distance to Rwanda's new leadership. French government and judiciary sources continuously are trying to put Rwanda's current President Paul Kagame in connection with a 1994 rocket attack on an aircraft in Kigali, killing the Presidents of Rwanda and Burundi and setting off the genocide.

Meanwhile, in Rwanda, the government and people at large are preparing for tomorrow's 11th anniversary of the 1994 genocide. During the commemoration week of mourning, many local communities focus on the exhumation of mass graves. Many of the estimated 800,000 bodies placed in mass graves during the genocide are exhumed and reburied in dignity during the annual commemoration week.

By staff writer

© afrol News

http://www.afrol.com/articles/16082
Logged

We should first show solidarity with each other. We are Africans. We are black. Our first priority is ourselves.
jemba
Junior Member
**
Posts: 203

YENGE BANTU


« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2005, 04:04:00 PM »

Yes they should be charged for what they are doing. But who will charge them not Afrikans not the kongolese, the kongolese people are busy looking towards the east of kongo to Rwanda. I think the people in Kivu should make peace with the Rwandan people and share their land, just take a look at Palestine and Israel, the people of kivu should stop looking towards kinshasha and turn their back towards it and welcome their true neighbours.  
Logged

Think Clear BE Clear>>>>Always Analyze never Dismiss We all are here to learn>>>>> this earth is a BIG class Room
Bantu_Kelani
Service Member
*****
Posts: 2063


WWW
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2005, 03:46:35 PM »

The problem with "alliance with the Rwandans" and letting them into Congo has turns out to be just as bad or worse than their genocide in 1994. The corruption, brutality, and lack of human rights the Rwandan troops commit in the DRC, with the UN forces remaining passive, is totally WRONG!

Read the UN Commission on Human Rights, under the title Report on the situation of human rights in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (former Zaire) documents, you will see severe human rights abuses committed by the Ugandan and Rwandan armies, and the Congolese rebels supported by Uganda and Rwanda.

Recently, they all are the enemies of the Congolese civilians.. when the US gave them substantial assistance they stabbed President Laurent Desire Kabila in the back. Rwandans should not be welcomed anymore in Congo, our warm welcome to them turned out against us! Jemba, if you are really concerned about the protection of "your" people you should not think about what you say.  

B.K
Logged

We should first show solidarity with each other. We are Africans. We are black. Our first priority is ourselves.
Bantu_Kelani
Service Member
*****
Posts: 2063


WWW
« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2005, 04:02:54 PM »

CLARE SHORT: "OH KAGAME IS SUCH A SWEETIE!"  
 
Lokongo Bafalikike

On 30th of July, President Paul Kagame of Rwanda and his Congolese counterpart Joseph Kabila signed a peace deal in Pretoria, South Africa, which provides for the withdrawal in "90 days" of Rwanda's Tusti-led army from the Democratic Republic of Congo in exchange for Kinshasa's demobilisation, disarmament and repatriation (DDR) of thousands of Hutus, the ex-Forces Armées Rwandaises (FAR) - Interahamwe militia accused of Rwanda's 1994 genocide. The agreement has been welcomed by the UN Security Council, the EU, the AU and the US. This, albeit the fact that it does not address Rwanda's role in the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo and its accountability in a genocide of more 3.5million Congolese since 1998 and the looting of Congo's natural and mineral resources, with complicity of so-called Congolese rebels and the backing of Britain, America and Western multinationals. For the ordinary Congolese people bearing the brunt of an unjust war imposed on them, this latest accord between Congo and one of its aggressors and invaders from the east is yet another proof that maybe the rest of the world is conceding to the dictates of Rwanda with respect to its troops remaining definitely in Congo to annex the eastern part of Congo (all the previous agreements have fallen by the wayside). And they are absolutely right. Rwanda has started circulating its currency, the Rwandan franc, in the Congolese territories it controls, where also its national telephone code applies. Rwandan troops are forcing the local Congolese population under occupation to sing their country's national anthem and the Rwandan flag is hoisted at every public places in Rwanda-occupied territories. Rwanda has therefore already implanted all the symbols of its national sovereignty on Congolese soil, despite local resistance.

"Hutus can be disarmed in 90 days if Congo is serious," commented Charles Murigande, secretary general of Rwanda's Tutsi-led ruling party, Rwanda Patriotic Front (RPF).

However, Paul Kagame has been compared to a "tree that hides the forest" because he enjoys the backing of Britain and America to have a free rein in Congo. Rwanda, a tiny country in central Africa has accordingly become the most influential country in that region.

The Daily Telegraph, a London-based daily, on 8th August reported that critics of Rwandan expansionism have accused Clare Short, the British International Development Secretary, of providing major funding for the Tutsi-led Rwandan regime and turning a blind eyes to atrocities Rwandan troops are committing against the people of Congo. The Financial Times, another British daily revealed that the British government now gives Rwanda $36 million a year just "to cover its budget deficit".

The report said that according to senior UN officials, when Miss Short was challenged about British policy towards Kagame's government, she replied: "Oh, but he is such a sweetie!".

It is hard to see how Rwandan troops are going to withdraw from Congo after they have seized mineral mines there which are still pumping vast sums into its impoverished economy, and feeding the mobile phone and the computer chips industry in the West, to name but a few.

In a White House press briefing following the accord, Pierre Prosper, the US State Department ambassador-at-large for War Crimes said: "We want to see Rwanda withdraw from the Congo. But we also want to see the Democratic Republic of Congo take steps to address Rwanda's security concerns."

Prosper then went on "reminding" all states in the Central African region "of their international obligations to co-operate with the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR).

"This means that all the states in the region, particularly the Democratic Republic of Congo, The Republic of the Congo 9the neighbouring former French colony), and Angola, must seek and arrest all inductees that may be on their territory. Only through a concerted regional and international effort will we be able to take the steps that are necessary to achieve lasting peace in region," he said.

Asked whether the US had any intention of putting in place sanctions in case Rwanda failed to withdraw its troops from Congo, Prosper was rather vague.

"What you can see and expect from the US is a country that will be engaged with the parties in the region, will work with South Africa as the broker of the peace agreement to find a way to move this process forward by way of a 'monitoring mechanism'."

At the meeting of the UN Security Council on the Democratic Republic of Congo, held in New York on 8th August, UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan called the agreement "an ambitious agenda whose objectives could only be met if the international community invested all its energy and resources".

"I think the international community has the obligation to provide every necessary support - financial and logistic - to ensure the success of this initiative," Annan said.

On the same occasion, Léonard Okitundu, Congo's foreign minister also called on the international community "to invest itself concretely without sparing any means". Mr Okitundu accused Rwanda of still deploying more troops into Congo even as it was signing the agreement.

"Rwanda," he said, "remained the only country that was still engaging in military operations on a big scope on the Congolese soil."

Okitundu said his government was ready to make similar peace agreements with Uganda and Burundi, Congo's two other invaders beside Rwanda, as well as hold an all-inclusive power-sharing inter-Congolese dialogue, including with various Congolese rebel factions created by Rwanda, Uganda and Burundi.

He called for the UN to rewrite the mandate of the UN Mission in Congo (known by its French acronym, MONUC) to allow peace keepers - together with the soon to be deployed 1,500 South African troops - to help his government demobilise, disarm and repatriate Hutu militias . The Hutu militia are now widely known to be scattered across eastern Congo, the very territory Rwandan troops have occupied for almost six years now without managing to flash them out, albeit their "military superiority".

"MONUC," Okitundu said, "needed 'new operations concepts' and should thereafter be stationed as a buffer between Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo."

A diplomatic source told New African that Kagame still had more cards to play now that he could still hold on the pretext of the Interahamwe to kill, neutralise national resistance and loot in Congo in order to occupy it definitely and enrich himself and the clique around him.

The source said: "Kagame will have the last word as far as the outcome of this agreement is concerned. He will be able to dispute the number of the Interahamwe living in Congo. So 'a new war of number will emerge. The Congolese government says there are no Hutu militia in the territories still under its control after it rounded up 2,000 Hutu fighters in the military base of Kamina. But Kagame doesn't want to know about them. He estimates that they are more than 50,000.

The source added: "Kagame is also afraid of withdrawing his 35,000 troops from Congo, most of whom have not been paid since the invasion, while his top generals have amassed wealth looted in Congo and have built beautiful villas throughout Rwanda. Many Rwandan soldiers have died in the jungle of Congo and their families are claiming their bodies back. Kagame has no answer for them. He is not therefore in a hurry to withdraw his troops from Congo. Kagame is also trying to remote-control the political process in Congo, underestimating Congolese nationalism. His ambition and dream to conquer Congo is clearly not working."

In fact, this latest peace accord intervene at a time when Kigali has politically and militarily been weakened in Congo. The RCD, a Congolese rebel movement it created to use it as a "smoke screen" for its occupation of Congo is almost on the brink of disintegration following massive defections.

The French daily Le Monde reported on 27 July that Kigali has lost more than 2,000 men as a result of fighting between its troops and the Mai-Mai Congolese combatants backed by Kinshasa since April this year.

In an interview with Le Monde, General David Padiri, the leader of the Mai-Mai vowed "to fight on until the last Rwandan invader is either captured and killed or expelled from the Congolese territory."

Whatever happens, "sweetie Kagame" has no more pretexts to brandish in order to cling to the "land of milk and honey" he has found in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

http://www.congopanorama.info/art-short.shtml
Logged

We should first show solidarity with each other. We are Africans. We are black. Our first priority is ourselves.
jemba
Junior Member
**
Posts: 203

YENGE BANTU


« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2005, 09:36:13 PM »

Yenge yaya kelani


Like the honourable khalid Mohamed once said bless our great pharaohs ancestors soul. Revolution is A 160 degree cycle before a mother gives birth to a new child, the baby turns 160 degrees to come out of the mother’s womb and then there is blood.

The kongolese peoples problems are not outside of the country, one man can’t change or rule or dictate a country as big as kongo. The mentality of the people of kongo is the only thing that is wrong with that country, it will take an event that is bigger then the war that is going on right now to wake them up.


Bundu dia kongo

Bundu means union

Dia means of

Kongo means God

The same kongolese in that country are the same people who use to call themselves NZambi.

Nako linga mingi soki otali kombo oyo na internet Bundu Dia Kongo

Yenge ya ya


Logged

Think Clear BE Clear>>>>Always Analyze never Dismiss We all are here to learn>>>>> this earth is a BIG class Room
Bantu_Kelani
Service Member
*****
Posts: 2063


WWW
« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2005, 04:24:27 AM »

Jemba,

It is foolish for you to say that the Congolese people carry the burden of blame for the DRC’s problems. Why denial of the Western Imperialist nations covert sponsorship of the Congo’s coup d’etats, their overthrow in 1960 of the elected prime minister Patrice Lumbumba, their persistent support for the dictator Mobutu Sese Seko, and the Belgians who imagined and enforced tribal antagonism everywhere they went??? Don’t you see our greatest misfortune was to be colonized by men of small spirit in the first place? It is dishonest for you to pretend like there is no link between what’s going on in the DRC and the Western power foreign policy, the effects are with us today!!!

I wonder what part of the Congo River you come from, the Congo-Brazaville or Congo-Kinshasa? So many Congolese next door see no scandal in the humanitarian tragedy in the DRC. All this ignoring is [censored] up!

Nako tala "Bundu Dia Kongo" te! Pona nini ozo tuna??

B.K
Logged

We should first show solidarity with each other. We are Africans. We are black. Our first priority is ourselves.
jemba
Junior Member
**
Posts: 203

YENGE BANTU


« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2005, 10:58:29 AM »

Lumumba himself said “I came to early may the generation in the future forgive me”  

The kongolese people Waite for a leader but there is one Wright in their midst, they condemn him for not preaching the bible so we must Waite longer. Not just anyone will lead that country it’s destined for great things.

The people must be ready first without the people there can’t be a leader.

Kabila was a great man but he was never appreciated or protected by his people
It cant keep on happening like that the people have to change how many time is the most high going to send them a leader for them to mock and stone.




Soki opesi muana biloko yako lia ako boya ti ako yoka nzala



Bundu dia kongo


Union of the most high
Logged

Think Clear BE Clear>>>>Always Analyze never Dismiss We all are here to learn>>>>> this earth is a BIG class Room
jemba
Junior Member
**
Posts: 203

YENGE BANTU


« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2005, 04:33:36 PM »

Your last writings sounded just like XFRODOBAGGINS
Logged

Think Clear BE Clear>>>>Always Analyze never Dismiss We all are here to learn>>>>> this earth is a BIG class Room
Bantu_Kelani
Service Member
*****
Posts: 2063


WWW
« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2005, 02:09:07 PM »

Quote
Your last writings sounded just like XFRODOBAGGINS

Is that a way for you to discredit me?

Do me a favor don’t address me on the boards.

B.K

Logged

We should first show solidarity with each other. We are Africans. We are black. Our first priority is ourselves.
jemba
Junior Member
**
Posts: 203

YENGE BANTU


« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2005, 08:25:11 PM »

Yenge Muntu



NO YOU GOT ME TOTALLY WRONG!!!

I would never do anything out of emotions or for my own benefits.

I was just proving or encouraging you to a path>>>>>>>>>Bundu Dia Kongo

I would really feel bad if you dislike or pre judge this message of unification
for all Nubians because of a single individual ME.

I do apologize




Logged

Think Clear BE Clear>>>>Always Analyze never Dismiss We all are here to learn>>>>> this earth is a BIG class Room
Pages: [1] Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Copyright © 2001-2005 AfricaSpeaks.com and RastafariSpeaks.com
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!