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24987 Posts in 9558 Topics by 966 Members Latest Member: - Jahirae Most online today: 105 (July 03, 2005, 11:25:30 PM)
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| | |-+  Cosmetic Surgery To Look Whiter Fails To Boost Women’s Self-Esteem
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Author Topic: Cosmetic Surgery To Look Whiter Fails To Boost Women’s Self-Esteem  (Read 13972 times)
Makini
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« on: July 12, 2013, 09:29:33 PM »

Cosmetic Surgery To Look Whiter Fails To Boost Women’s Self-Esteem

July 8, 2013

Embodying racism: Race, rhinoplasty, and self-esteem in Venezuela

Many black or racially mixed women in Venezuela are undergoing nose jobs in an effort to look whiter, but the procedure only temporarily improves their self-esteem and body image in a culture that values whiteness, a Dartmouth College study finds.

Cosmetic surgery is increasingly common in many countries, including Venezuela, where an obsession with physical appearance prompts many women to get breast implants, face lifts, liposuction and other cosmetic procedures. But the trend has also sparked controversy — the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez blamed cosmetic surgeons for pressuring Venezuelan women into having unnecessary surgery they can’t afford.

In her study, Lauren Gulbas, an assistant professor of anthropology, examined how aesthetic ideals promoted by the cosmetic surgery industry interact with local ideas about race in Caracas, where she focused on rhinoplasty, more commonly known as a “nose job.” The article, titled “Embodying Racism: Race, Rhinoplasty, and Self-Esteem in Venezuela,” appears in the journal Qualitative Health Research.

The study included 63 white, black or racially mixed women — 24 had undergone rhinoplasty and 39 wanted to change their nose through rhinoplasty. All of the women wanted la nariz perfilada, or a “well-formed nose” that is tall, slender and associated with being white, which is the so-called “gold standard” of rhinoplasty. All of the black or racially mixed women with broad, flat noses linked with African heritage wanted la nariz perfilada in an effort to improve their self-esteem by looking whiter.

Racial categories in Venezuela are defined predominantly according to skin color, a flexible system made possible through mestizaje, or racial mixing. On the surface, mestizaje seems to promote equality by encouraging racial and cultural fusion of European, Indian and African ancestry, but in practice, Venezuelan national heritage prioritizes light skin and European physical features, according to Gulbas.

“Rhinoplasty is offered by physicians and interpreted by patients as a resolution to body dissatisfaction and low self-esteem,” Gulbas writes, but that thinking fails to acknowledge how perceptions of the self and body are strongly tied to racial marginalization. “Patients’ efforts to alter the nose reveal attempts to change not only how the body looks, but how it is lived. As a result, cosmetic surgery only acts as a stop-gap measure to heighten one’s self-esteem and body image.”


Source: http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/1112892199/cosmetic-surgery-to-look-whiter-fails-to-boost-womens-self-esteem/
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Nakandi
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« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2013, 08:39:01 AM »

Just came out of a Psyciatry class (med school in Poland) where they used Before and After pictures of black celebrities who turned white. They were 'diagnosed' with dysmorphophobic disorders that are seen in personality disorders... They were to be treated...
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Tyehimba
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« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2013, 08:50:00 PM »

To be treated how?
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Nakandi
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« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2013, 10:32:59 PM »

With psychotherapy and ''if sometimes necessary, with pharmacotherapy''
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Makini
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« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2014, 11:43:42 AM »

Interesting, do you think people can cure racism with drugs, can social ills associated with racism in society today be "fixed" with pills? This reminds me of a study that claims to have a cure for racism http://jezebel.com/5891457/can-a-pill-really-cure-racism.
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Nakandi
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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2014, 08:16:47 AM »

Makini,

I followed the link within the link you posted to http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/9128888/Heart-disease-drug-combats-racism.html.

"A common heart disease drug may have the unusual side-effect of combating racism, a new study suggests."

This suggests that racism is a disease, and by extension takes away some of the responsibility the "affected" subject has. The first name that came to mind when I read that was Anders Breivik. Sick bodies tend to be  sympathised with. Consequently, if a study were to continue and "prove" that a drug can combat racism (whatever that means) then we would need to change our view on racists.

More than a third of the volunteers had a "negative" IAT score, meaning they were biased towards being non-racist at a subconscious level...Propranolol had no effect on a different measure of "explicit" racial prejudice, religious and sexual prejudice, or prejudice against drug addicts. I wonder what this means.

"We don't know whether the drug influenced racial attitudes only or whether it altered implicit brain systems more generally.
"And we can't rule out the possibility that the effects were due to the drug incidentally reducing heart rate. So although interesting, in my view these preliminary results are a long way from suggesting that propranolol specifically influences racial attitudes."
This was a good conclusion, in my view.

I think drugs can act on the anxiety that comes as a result of racism, but not the racist biases themselves.


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