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25516 Posts in 9753 Topics by 980 Members Latest Member: - Roots Dawta Most online today: 61 (July 03, 2005, 11:25:30 PM)
+  Africa Speaks Reasoning Forum
|-+  GENERAL
| |-+  Tyehimba Salandy (Moderator: Tyehimba)
| | |-+  Reason and Emotions
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Author Topic: Reason and Emotions  (Read 6350 times)
Iniko Ujaama
InikoUjaama
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Posts: 528


« Reply #15 on: October 28, 2013, 05:34:23 PM »

Kurious Rose

I think my reluctance was really from not knowing and also I think from a discomfort with what I have seen as the impact of how it was placed in heirarchy in the past(that is reason as it is narrowly defined being elevated as superior to emotion). However your answer has brought some light and clarity which I will have to meditate on.
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Belle
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« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2013, 02:45:59 AM »

I don't necessarily agree that in all instances, it is a case of "emotions, then reason". There have been instances where an individual can reason first which then leads to an emotion or emotions.

For example, an individual can reason with themselves as to whether or not they want to advance themselves and explore the various avenues they could use to accomplish this. After weighing the pros and cons of these options, the individual will then come to a decision as to which course is best suited for them, from which an emotion can be derived.
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Belle
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Posts: 29


« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2013, 01:31:49 PM »

KiwNak said "I might be missing points here so I am going to ask for some elucidation from those who have commented so far - is reason to rationality and emotion to irrationality?"

If we're to adhere to "reason to rationality and emotion to irrationality", then we're advocating that Eurocentric and patriarchal thought. Plato once argued that emotions and reasoning pulls us in opposite directions. However, it does not have to be a case of "one or the other". Like Tyehimba said:

"I can think of times when I made a reasoned assessment of something, based on where I was at that point in time, and my emotional state invoked  a sense caution despite my ‘reasoning’. Alternatively, I can also think of times in which I had a very emotional reaction to a situation and used reason to pull me back to a balanced state where I could have made a better decision."

Thus, once an individual uses a combination of emotions and reasoning, they will yield the best outcome.

To me, if an individual makes a decision solely on either reason or emotions, is an act of irrationality.


 
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Kurious Rose
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« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2013, 03:04:08 PM »

Belle

Yes, you are correct.
 
There are many instances where the causal factor of an emotion is not an external, fight or flight, or previously conditioned something, but a reason. A reason can bring feelings of euphoria and clarity or hurt, anger etc., which may or may not move one to action. So on a day to day level, reason can follow from emotion. For example, learning how one contributes to racism, colorism, gender discrimination, size discrimination etc. may cause feelings of hurt, anger and embarrassment. From there, that person may decide to act (or not) in whatever way they feel to remedy poor conditioning.
 
From my experience, however, I have never observed one coming into reason without a prior emotional stimulus. In other words, people are mostly moved by some emotional trigger before they absorb and accept reason. For example, before people take the step to learn about themselves, it is usually some emotion or feeling that leads them there. Another example: if a person was conditioned to believe that he was unattractive or worthless and then engages a reasoning to show otherwise it is usually that prior emotion of feeling dread and worthlessness that feeds the emotional response to the reasoning. So in this sense, emotion comes first and reason follows which can then bring forth emotion and so on.

KiwNak

Labelling emotion as 'low' and 'positive' was done to differentiate between states of emotion that people can have. To elaborate, let me use different terminology. People can either have uninformed emotion or informed emotion. Uninformed emotion can be the result of a lack of experience, ignorance, arrogance or poor conditioning.  However, if uninformed emotion is based partly on lack of experience or ignorance and a person is honest, then when engaging one's own thought process or even others, it is still possible for reason to occur.

Informed emotion is predicated upon constant work, honesty and effort which inform the development of reason-ability thereby gaining better impulses. Of course, informed emotion is not always right so one still needs reason in order to act properly.

My view on your question “is reason to rationality and emotion to irrationality”: given that emotion is an impulsive reaction, then emotion cannot be rational nor can it be irrational. Rationality requires deliberation which can lead to reason or unreason. Thus, reason is rational and unreason is irrational. Emotion can be predicated upon reason and can be positive and right but it is not in itself rational or irrational.

By the way, the article ''Can Emotional Intelligence Be Taught?'' was an interesting find. Much to say on that but I will be brief. What Marc Brackett is attempting to do is not teach emotion but to teach response.  I generally mistrust institutionalizing the teaching of emotional response because more likely than not it would be taught by people who have internalized, unreasoned biases and negative prejudice. But then again, that is done in all kinds of ways outside the school system anyway. I hope others read this and share their views on this too.

Kurious Rose.
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Nakandi
KiwNak
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Posts: 490


« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2013, 06:39:53 PM »

Kurious Rose, thank you for mentioning response. It assists me better appreciate reason, unreason. Something for me to further reflect on.
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Nakandi
KiwNak
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Posts: 490


« Reply #20 on: November 24, 2013, 11:09:52 AM »

Here is something on reasoning

http://rastafaritimes.com/rasnews/viewnews.cgi?newsid1047677439,82598,.shtml
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