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25304 Posts in 9648 Topics by 980 Members Latest Member: - Roots Dawta Most online today: 68 (July 03, 2005, 11:25:30 PM)
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 1 
 on: July 22, 2017, 03:56:00 AM 
Started by Nakandi - Last post by Dani37
To me this question is answered when one decides that inter racial dating and mating is an option. Once that decision has been made to step into that reality unless she is like the presenter, adopt or is infertile mixed raced children are your portion.

The question then becomes how does one handle the colourism issue within a household of this nature when one of the children (especially if they are both girls) is darker or more like mummy. How does mummy preach self love and replication when mummy chose daddy? How does mummy equip said darker girl child without some hard harsh truths that will offend one? How does mummy balance the esteem and value of both girls?

 2 
 on: July 22, 2017, 03:38:02 AM 
Started by Ayinde - Last post by Dani37
When this story occurred I stepped back and observed the reactions of our society hoping even praying that we would surprise me....we didn't.

We aren't even seen as worth the effort by ourselves. The people that were baying hardest at the moon for the blood of the perpetuator didn't look like Shannon they looked like the countless missing and dead young, middle age and older darker skinned women whose posters we ignore in City Gate or when their family send out post pleading for information. We don't even come to our own rescue.

Some said the reason the response was so strong was because of the ordinariness of her activities and the brutality of her end. My question was 'when a young Sister or Brother goes to a job interview and never returns isn't that just as ordinary?'

 3 
 on: July 15, 2017, 04:55:18 PM 
Started by Iniko Ujaama - Last post by Iniko Ujaama
All of what you have mentioned here are interconnected.

 4 
 on: July 05, 2017, 08:56:22 PM 
Started by Nakandi - Last post by Nakandi
East African hunter-gatherer research suggests the human microbiome is an ecological disaster zone

The world we occupy today is very different from the one occupied by our not-so-distant ancestors. As we enter a new geological epoch – the Anthropocene, in which the human footprint has left its mark – there is much concern about global deforestation, melting ice sheets and general biosphere degradation. But another, often overlooked, casualty of this new epoch is the diversity of microorganisms (including bacteria, viruses and fungi) that live on and in us. If our microbiome – the genetic diversity of these organisms – is a canary in the microbial coal mine, then my work with East African hunter-gatherers suggests that it is hanging upside down on its perch.

In the field I have watched a Hadza hunter skillfully butcher a baboon and share meat with others around a fire. Nothing goes to waste. Organs, including the brain, are consumed along with raw colon and stomach. By sterile Western standards, it is a gruesome sight for an evening meal. No matter how many times I watch Hadza carve up animals dispatched with a bow and arrow, I am always taken aback by the extraordinary exchange of microbes between this group and their environment. A microbial tango that probably characterised the entirety of human evolution.

Why is this important? Recent research has shown that disease is often associated with a fall in microbial diversity. What we don’t know is which way cause and effect runs. Does disease cause a drop in microbial diversity or does a drop in diversity cause – or precede – disease?

It’s still early days and a lot of work lies ahead. However, the idea that the microbes, and the diversity of microbes, that we carry may help us better understand and head off disease has spawned a level of optimism in medical research not seen since the introduction of antibiotics over 50 years ago.

Which brings me back to the Hadza.

Living and working among the Hadza makes me think of the intimate relationship humans have probably evolved with diverse groups of microbes. With each animal killed, microbes are given the opportunity to move from one species to the next. With each berry that is plucked from a bush or tuber dug from beneath the microbial-rich ground, each and every act of foraging keeps the Hadza connected to an extensive regional (microbial) species pool.

It is their persistent exposure to this rich pool of microorganisms that has endowed the Hadza with an extraordinary diversity of microbes; much greater than we see among people in the so-called developed world.


Ecology with gut feeling

Viewed through the lens of ecology, the less diverse gut microbiome in the West can potentially be seen as either a result of a degraded regional species pool (all species available to colonise a local site) or an increase of environmental filters (things that thwart or limit the movement of microbes in the environment, or alter their composition). A combination of both is probably at play.

Much attention has been focused on environmental filters, such as diet, as the primary culprit for decreasing microbial diversity in the Western gut. Another environmental filter is the overuse of antibiotics. Each course of antibiotics can reduce the diversity of microbes in the host. Other filters may include too much time spent indoors, an increase in caesarean births and a decrease in breastfeeding rates, antimicrobial products such as handgels, small doses of antibiotics in the meat we eat, and modern hygiene.

But the contribution of the regional species pool gets little attention in microbial research. I suspect it has something to do with the difficulties in such large-scale sampling and, of course, cost and priorities. Given that regional species pools - though focused on macroorganisms (organisms large enough to see with the naked eye) - is a central theme in ecology, it would be beneficial if it was incorporated into more human-microbe research.

Considering our classic environmental filtering example of antibiotics, one wonders if someone who took an antibiotic and experienced a reduction in microbial diversity would not recover more quickly - to their pre-antibiotic state of microbial diversity - if he or she had exposure to a robust and diverse regional species pool, once the course of antibiotics was completed.

Surely more attention and better management of environmental filters would pay dividends in improving microbial diversity in humans. However, having a better understanding of how ecological degradation may be hitting a little closer to home (our own gut) than most of us previously imagined may provide the much-needed impetus that this generation needs to finally put the health of ecosystems, large and small, into perspective.

Importantly, all the buzz around the microbiome may be an opportune moment to mobilise a much-needed group of micro-environmentalists to better teach how to appreciate the importance of what’s happening to our shared biosphere.

https://theconversation.com/east-african-hunter-gatherer-research-suggests-the-human-microbiome-is-an-ecological-disaster-zone-73668

 5 
 on: July 05, 2017, 03:25:11 AM 
Started by Tyehimba - Last post by Tyehimba
The Counter Revolution of 1776 and the Construction of Whiteness – Gerald Horne

The Counter Revolution of 1776 and the Construction of Whiteness – Gerald Horne, (3/6)

 6 
 on: July 04, 2017, 02:25:27 AM 
Started by Jahirae - Last post by Jahirae
Thank You Nakandi this was very helpful

 7 
 on: July 02, 2017, 11:28:37 PM 
Started by Nakandi - Last post by Dani37
Quote
Romanticism in itself is a bit problematic if not well-appreciated because often it is tied to fantasies and the exaggerated feelings about the real or imagined goodness of someone. In that mode, it often downplays all the ‘flaws’ of the individual being romanticized. So, with that in mind, the idea of romantic love can often be filled with a lot of delusions, but I can easily acknowledge that someone can be romantic in an objective function of love as I defined above.

Nothing but truth here...at least from my perspective.

Quote
While this statement can be true, I am suspicious of how people can arrive at this position. Some people may arrive here trying to hold on to a fantasy partner that might not want to commit, or commit to them

This too is a very real possibility.



 8 
 on: July 02, 2017, 09:51:19 PM 
Started by Nakandi - Last post by Nakandi
On the Fence about Having Biracial Children
On the Fence about Having Biracial Children

 9 
 on: July 02, 2017, 08:10:41 PM 
Started by Nakandi - Last post by Nakandi
It is difficult to have a discussion on a topic like love, when generally what most people bring to the table is the feeling of love and not a definition or objective. Emotions can vary, and they can have validity.

From what I gleaned from my reasonings with that Black man I spoke about, is that he never told anyone he was in love with them back then and he used to explain to all of them that he was trying to discover the true meaning of love. That did not diminish his appreciation and ability to care for the people he engaged. As I said before, perhaps one day he will develop this aspect of the reasoning himself.

I appreciate that what you share are your perspective and experiences and not conclusions. A lot of the views I am sharing on this topic are based on ongoing reasonings about love. I am in no way implying that my position is the absolute for everybody.

I think love is within our power; it comes from within us, it is very knowable, and it has an objective. Based on the reasonings I have been having on this topic, I am in agreement with the perspective that was shared that "the object of love is to bring out the best in all of us".

Romanticism in itself is a bit problematic if not well-appreciated because often it is tied to fantasies and the exaggerated feelings about the real or imagined goodness of someone. In that mode, it often downplays all the ‘flaws’ of the individual being romanticized. So, with that in mind, the idea of romantic love can often be filled with a lot of delusions, but I can easily acknowledge that someone can be romantic in an objective function of love as I defined above.

Quote
To me the problem with 'romantic' love is the idea that there is 'one way' for that love to 'look'...married, kids etc.

While this statement can be true, I am suspicious of how people can arrive at this position. Some people may arrive here trying to hold on to a fantasy partner that might not want to commit, or commit to them. But yes, I would agree that love is much more dynamic than the conventional structure and people may feel “the need to meet standards and actions that may not be right for them but deathly afraid of the social ramifications of not being conventional in their love”. This is especially true in non-western societies.

Quote
Why is physical sex compared to animalistic behavior?

Because in my mind it is true, and someone asking that might assume that I am stating animalistic behavior is somehow bad, and I am not. I am however implying that as human beings we can give rational thought to who and how we engage sexually that rises above poor conditionings associated with tradition, race, class, gender, and age. We can also cultivate healthier concepts and feelings of love. Here I am speaking from experience.

If motivations are going beyond what those sexually involved can deliver, then they need to question why they are sexually involved in the first place. I think far too often sex comes out of romanticism and is placed before careful consideration of the objectives of the parties involved. This does not mean that people should not have sex for whatever pleasures they derive from it.

 10 
 on: July 02, 2017, 06:53:01 PM 
Started by Nakandi - Last post by Dani37
Nakandi

Your example of the Black man and his changing perspectives on love is ideal. My wonder is if at any point did or has he evaluated how he shows and offers love and how his behaviours may influence what he is experiencing....at least in the romantic area of love. And in exploring the concept of love I would have wanted to delve deeper into whether he had ever considered his  behaviour in love....

Nothing i have expressed is a conclusion but my perspective based on observations and yes my own experiences in the area of love (not only limited to romantic but also familial) the intention is never to disparage but to bring another train of thought.

Love, it's manifestations and expressions are unique to each of us but when something doesn't seem to work or is negatively recurring in that love (romantic or otherwise) one needs to evaluate the constants and how they contribute to one not getting or achieving what they want and that becomes more challenging when u hold the creed that love and how one gets to the point of love is external to your power control and 'unknowable'...and that frustration and anxiety could be significantly lessened if we acknowledge that we are where we are in love due in part to things that we have control of and choices in.

To me the problem with 'romantic' love is the idea that there is 'one way' for that love to 'look'...married, kids etc. And people feeling the need to meet standards and actions that may not be right for them but deathly afraid of the social ramifications of not being conventional in their love.

Why is physical sex compared to animalistic behaviour? Physical sex serves it's purposes and functions and only becomes problematic when the motivations go beyond what it can deliver. And those who will have the other person one way or the other pay a price for that decision and on some level understand the potential opportunity cost of that decision. Love and physical sex aren't linear nor should physical sex be considered an expression of love...in my opinion.
 

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