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25517 Posts in 9753 Topics by 980 Members Latest Member: - Roots Dawta Most online today: 43 (July 03, 2005, 11:25:30 PM)
+  Africa Speaks Reasoning Forum
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| | |-+  The Issue of Colorism
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Author Topic: The Issue of Colorism  (Read 38580 times)
fierytrini
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« Reply #15 on: May 13, 2012, 01:25:49 AM »

The author was a poet Valmiki, commissioned by a King.

The Bible was written after the release of the Mahabhatara.

We have gone over the factors leading to India's colorism.

Colorism in so far as types of dress won't necessarily afect clothing choices. There are different types of clothing which is represented by the type of region or group.
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diyouth
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« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2012, 12:04:39 PM »

Fierytrini,

check: http://kemetway.com/massey1.html


On the above page it shows elements of the 'biblical story' compared to an earlier 'Kemet story' dating 4000 bce. Which is around the time you say the Mahabharat is dated though other sources date it 5th 4th century bc - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramayana  http://hinduism.about.com/od/epics/a/ramayana.htm

As well on the same page: http://kemetway.com/massey1.html
A brief explanation is in order. African civilizations ranging from Kemet / Egypt in North Africa to Chou Civilization in Southern Asia (the area now called China) were invaded by Aryan predators (now called Europeans, Arabs, and Asians) beginning approximately 1,500 BCE (Before Common Era). With each civilization / society that was conquered the invaders used the spoils to fabricate societies of their own; the invaders of China created Jainism and Confucims; those in India created Brahmanism; those in Asia Minor created Zoroastrianism, and Judaism; and those invading Kemet created "Greek Philosophy", Christianity and Islam.

Dr. Velu Annamalai (part 4 of his lecture), sez "to define religion, it is sanctified racism".

and you say you've gone over the factors leading to India's colorism...

 
Bless



Guidance
diyouth
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diyouth
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« Reply #17 on: May 13, 2012, 10:17:44 PM »

"and you say you've gone over the factors leading to India's colorism..."

note: this line wasn't intended to be condescending, instead that since all the factors are covered, from the African or Indian prospective, mentioned or not in this "discussion"...then what? inferring to my first response in this "discussion", all this information and still...one is shunned, rebuked even if you present this info to people...then what? division all over again? as in who accepts this is good but whoever 'denies' has some character flaw...as authors of both written articles included in this discussion, conclude pointing fingers at each others 'flaw' as cowering or discontented...over what? whats changed? theres more to it than the labeled "colorism", evidently...

anyways mi chat tuh much...lol I'll get out of the way now...bless

Guidance
diyouth

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fierytrini
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« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2012, 01:06:22 PM »

diyouth,

I welcome your responses. Did not view as condescending.

Much respect that you were intrigued on this topic.

Of course there are considerable factors in any group that has led to a colorism divide. And I'm sure the more we research the more we will unearth new reasons.

The kemetway link was duly informative.
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Makini
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« Reply #19 on: May 15, 2012, 12:27:15 AM »

Quote
colorism, another intellectual redefinition;
or does one really think by "exposing" someones said 'colorism' someone will change???

write endless books an articles as to why some behave an think the way they do,
is like continually reminding a youth why he will not 'make it' pass age 25....
saying because he's black, colorism, lazy, doesn't help him nor the issue....IMO

Quote
Analytical approach, assessment sans opinion, continuously identifies a la intellectualizing.
As well the analytical approach in the order of gaining factual information,
requires one to be 'highly educated' an versed with the grasp of concepts from previous assessments, as such, colorism.


diyouth

I do not agree with what you are suggesting in this post. If I understand correctly you are saying, intellectualizing, by which you mean doing research about an issue and then discussing and sometimes documenting it to become better informed, and better inform interested parties, is a bad thing? The response by Leslie offers another opportunity to explore this issue given the ‘misleading and ill-informing’ article written by Akilah Holder. Her response presented some aspects of Colorism less well thought out and sought to increase sensitivity to the complexity of the issue. It also aimed to present the perspective of a dark skinned kinky haired African, a rebuttal to what Akilah Holder offered.

To me, you use intellectualizing as a negative thing here, as a problem, when in fact it should be the opposite. People should engage in discussions, people should reason things out in an effort to gain better perspectives, ideas, to become more aware about the differences of our experiences, be they cultural, religious, political, social or otherwise (even if these discussions become heated at times). A group of people will usually engage in a discussion to increase the overall understanding and awareness of a given group. It is mutual. This increased sensitivity may allow for taking better actions, for arriving at solutions to problems that may benefit all, for combatting discrimination and abuse, either consciously or unconsciously etc. Therefore it’s not necessarily about some “mak(ing) decisions on our behalf”. Nothing is stopping others from putting their views on the table for considerations. In fact it’s presenting a part of the story that others may benefit from. Should white folks write about Colorism, or should the people most affected – darker skinned persons - do so? In fact, whites write and have written about many things. Others should be encouraged to generate their own ideas, concepts, information and knowledge which in turn helps to counter misinformation generated, especially in a historical context. One’s freedom to express and properly articulate one’s ideas should apply to all groups and should be on the agenda of anyone really seeking to reason and develop. Non-academic folks do it, and all persons should be encouraged to do the same. This is a forum that allows for articulating issues in a written form. So any communication here can be considered intellectualizing, including your contributions.

I find it highly ironic that you come to a Reasoning Forum whose main purpose is for persons to exchange experiences, ideas, information, attempt to critically assess issues, reason out problems, seek personal development, become more aware of discrimination and issues related to how the system has dealt with Africans and other marginalised or oppressed groups AND have a problem with them ‘intellectualizing’ an issue so critical as Colorism. What do you seek to accomplish by rejecting the idea of free discourse on Colorism, an issue that is so pervasive and yet so unaddressed. I also don’t understand why you chose the word ‘redefinition’. What is wrong with redefining this issue or any issue, if it betters our understanding of how such social ills work and fester in society especially given the fact that there are not “endless” books on Colorism. If anything, it’s an issue that is constantly dismissed and downplayed in society.

I think that if you have a problem with redefinition and ‘writing endless books’, then you should have a problem with life in its entirety. Because what is our history and current state, if not a product of continuous discussion of ideas in science and the like, documented by our ancestors to the benefit of succeeding generations.

Someone studied the stars and documented what they observed, for the benefit of those either less apt at this skill or busy specialized – what you have called ‘highly educated’ - in some other activity like agriculture. But even the agriculturalist benefitted from an understanding of the heavens for sowing crops at the right time, for having enough water for them and for knowing when to reap the crops. What is the process of navigation if a group of explorers did not set off in a particular direction, discuss it, make maps and then others came after to improve it? And then these navigators read the books of those who wrote about stars and made suggestions for improvement to them based on what they came to observe in new lands… What is the point of laws and legal systems if Egyptians and persons even before them did not document them and follow them and or improve them for generations to come? A more recent example is that people came together to write laws that promoted, protected, legitimized and institutionalised racism and others came after to tear them up and write other laws that sought equality and to reduce racism in its most gross form. Therefore, I think people who have more experiences with one social ill, one field, one issue, one geographical location should be encouraged to put what they have on the table. Others who similarly have spent more time assessing and exploring some other subject should put their experiences, awareness, general better conceptual ability on the table and together both parties can have the potential to benefit, to act better, to make more informed decisions and to arrive at more appropriate solutions.

Finally you said….

Quote
IMObservation as a dark-skinned male in North America, in respect to both articles, 'cower', 'discontent', colorism, racism, are only identified
'hardly' dealt or defeated 'head-on'; nothing changes just identified (its limitation).

Quote
“...by "exposing" someones said 'colorism' someone will change???


Whether people choose to act differently is totally up to personal choice and never should be seen as an automatic thing, it’s an ever changing process, just as the issue of racism has evolved so has Colorism and may continue to and so has a range of other issues such as colonialism and gender discrimination. It is also about if you genuinely recognize that something is untrue, unfair, oppressive, abusive, disrespectful whether you should go on engaging in that action given the new information, especially if you stand to lose by moving away from this position. It also allows oppressed, abused people to realise that they are not the sole source of their discomforts and there are social problems beyond their personal control that affect them. This in turn can give them confidence in themselves and allows them the opportunity to make better choices. People cannot expect to see big social changes in an instance. These problems have been taking place for thousands of years, especially when we take into account the Indian experience as articulated by fierytrini.
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fierytrini
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« Reply #20 on: May 15, 2012, 07:40:19 PM »

http://www.africaresource.com/rasta/sesostris-the-great-the-egyptian-hercules/afro-india-some-historical-links-between-africa-and-india-jide-uwechia/

A useful article discussing the early descriptions of skin colour as well as the Africa-India link
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diyouth
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« Reply #21 on: May 16, 2012, 08:17:01 AM »

Makini,


It would be a big contradiction being against reasoning, discussing, sharing views,
and yet have the most posts in this discussion.

Intellectualizing is different from the aforementioned yet it is not a bad thing.
Like a shirt is not a bad thing however using it to hold water, you can intellectualize that however you'd like, it still is.

If you want to identify the problem and believe others should do the same, what you and Zainab have mentioned is appropriate.
Keep in mind before you identified what the problem is, you knew/felt something is wrong. Without this 'conviction' you wouldn't care, self-examine or possibly change!

Using the word loosely, those who 'benefit' from colorism have no 'conviction' of this type and of this problem; they will not identify, self-examine, change or perhaps care!

Hence they're more inclined to see colorism as a projection of ones insecurity/discontentment based on the same assessed, analyzed facts colorism is (re)defined to be.

In other words, considering that invasions, enslavement, caste-systems, mass media, etc.,
lead some persons to oppress the darker-skinned complexion.
Quoting those same considerations, persons have perceived some dark-skinned people
as incapable of identifying causes of conflicts which involve both dark and light-skinned persons, as anything other than 'colorism' -
- ref. points from Both articles.

It is the same facts, information assessed, examined, that constructs the view point on both 'sides'.
Thus the only 'change', evolution, edification is in the intellectualized sense; accumulation of more facts, more info,
more, documented and transmitted...

If what I've said is perceived as intellectualizing, i have no qualms with that!

"I think that if you have a problem with redefinition and ‘writing endless books’, then you should have a problem with life in its entirety. Because what is our history and current state, if not a product of continuous discussion of ideas in science and the like, documented by our ancestors to the benefit of succeeding generations. - Makini"


The Akan of Ghana have a proverb saying "Obi nkyere abofra Nyame"; no one teaches or points out 'God' to a child.

...colorism is a product of documentation, endless books, and so on. Even if you follow what Fierytrini shared as factors leading to colorism in the Indian realms, it is evident.

Distort documentation, impose religious texts, poetic writings, just about anything of record; present day its media, pics, video, music.
As long as people experience, 'self-examine', and validate life through these channels, they can be controlled, think an act out oppression.

If the light-skinned or 'white' see the darker-skinned, including all other physical features indicative of darker-skinned persons ( http://www.africaspeaks.com/reasoning/index.php?topic=7929.0 ), the texture, sound, feel, smell, intelligence. They're absolutely no reason or cause to feel down about being darker-skinned or see any reason to oppress darker skin...IMObservation, this is not straying away from the issue of 'colorism', but instead.


Fierytrini,
I'll will check out the link...give thanks...




Guidance
diyouth
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Makini
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« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2012, 02:50:58 AM »

diyouth

In the context of this discussion, intellectualizing equates to rationalizing a given issue. I do not know what other definition of intellectualizing you are using and how it applies to the contents on this thread.

Quote
“Using the word loosely, those who 'benefit' from colorism have no 'conviction' of this type and of this problem; they will not identify, self-examine, change or perhaps care!

Hence they're more inclined to see colorism as a projection of ones insecurity/discontentment based on the same assessed, analyzed facts colorism is (re)defined to be.”


‘conviction’? It is important to stress that if people do not understand an issue, then one cannot fault them for that. But it is when they shy away from learning the issues or do understand, and further fail to act with better conduct, that it becomes a situation of dismissiveness and dishonesty. But then again, there is evidence, even on these forums, where persons who benefit from colorism do not see raising these issues as “a projection of ones insecurity/discontentment …”

Quote
“...colorism is a product of documentation, endless books, and so on. Even if you follow what Fierytrini shared as factors leading to colorism in the Indian realms, it is evident.”


Colorism did not start with the writing of books. The behaviour came first and the books came after and were used to justify positions on colorism. Referencing and more importantly distorting ancient and modern texts have been used by one group of people to corner another group of people into particular roles.

Quote
“...inferring to my first response in this "discussion", all this information and still...one is shunned, rebuked even if you present this info to people...then what? division all over again?”


If something is the truth, then the idea of it being divisive is a non-issue.

Quote
“Distort documentation, impose religious texts, poetic writings, just about anything of record; present day its media, pics, video, music.

As long as people experience, 'self-examine', and validate life through these channels, they can be controlled, think an act out oppression.”


As long as people have the ability and means to do research and be aware of their history, they can be sensitive to elements and forces that try to control them. If you are aware that someone is misinforming you, you are less likely to be oppressed because, with information, you would be in a position to make better decisions rather than be blindly led. Or, if you are in a position where you cannot protect or defend yourself, your awareness still places you in a better position.

Quote
“If the light-skinned or 'white' see the darker-skinned, including all other physical features indicative of darker-skinned persons ( http://www.africaspeaks.com/reasoning/index.php?topic=7929.0 ), the texture, sound, feel, smell, intelligence. They're absolutely no reason or cause to feel down about being darker-skinned or see any reason to oppress darker skin...IMObservation, this is not straying away from the issue of 'colorism', but instead.”


My intention in writing what I did was not meant to be oppressive. It was an exploration of what Frantz Fanon wrote (Black Skin, White Mask). Indeed, there would be many that would dismiss his writings, but it can be very empowering to be critical of oneself and to engage in continuous self-assessment and refining of one’s ideas and actions. I made that post, so if anyone wants to come on the board and discuss it, I am open to that. The aim for me is to become more conscious of my thoughts, words and actions.

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diyouth
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« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2012, 07:51:43 AM »

Makini

"intellectualizing equates to rationalizing a given issue. I do not know what other definition of intellectualizing you are using and how it applies to the contents on this thread. -- Makini"

That same one! in my first post; How people would 'rationalize' the circumstance of a 'black' male who wont make it pass 25. Document write endless books nothing changes...but continuously rationalized. If 'changes' occur its not due to rationalizing or can it?


"It is important to stress that if people do not understand an issue, then one cannot fault them for that -- Makini"


People live it! They may not recollect or identify their experiences in the vocabulary or factual references that has been documented, discussed and reasoned by 'informed' persons. In this way, they do not 'understand'(right?); Though experienced it.

"But it is when they shy away from learning the issues or do understand, and further fail to act with better conduct, that it becomes a situation of dismissiveness and dishonesty. --Makini"

Is dismissiveness and dishonesty an issue of colorism though? 


"But then again, there is evidence, even on these forums, where persons who benefit from colorism do not see raising these issues as “a projection of ones insecurity/discontentment … -- Makini”


Just to be clear...Firstly, i said persons who benefit are "more inclined to" , never meant in a definite sense. Secondly responding to someone raising an issue is different from responding to someone who claims you are acting out an issue; colorism. Obviously a plus if everyone is mature about this.


"Colorism did not start with the writing of books. The behaviour came first and the books came after and were used to justify positions on colorism. Referencing and more importantly distorting ancient and modern texts have been used by one group of people to corner another group of people into particular roles. -- Makini"


Given you say the behaviour came first, before the books, manipulations, texts, media... was that ill behaviour invoked upon experiencing the darker-skinned pigment, lips, nose, hips, etc???

"If something is the truth, then the idea of it being divisive is a non-issue --Makini"

Explain non-issue? what is someone like Fierytrini to do, with or when persons are perceived to be dismissive or dishonest? 


"If you are aware that someone is misinforming you, you are less likely to be oppressed because, with information, you would be in a position to make better decisions rather than be blindly led. Or, if you are in a position where you cannot protect or defend yourself, your awareness still places you in a better position.--Makini"

The only way one is misinformed or misled, is if one is dependent on information and dependent upon being led; hence the previous quoted proverb. If you want to go to a destination, not sure of the address, then you need to be led or informed; dependent. Thus being dependent applies to things which are 'quantified'!; close but never there/here yet!!

As long as the 'invaders' or the 'enemy' can quantify the truth they don't even need to lie.
Because you will not act until you are 'prepared', or know enough, have analyzed, assess the information "properly". Which is just like your piece in the poetry forum, where their mask is still left to be shattered before he/she is fit do this or that!

Success or positive stereo-types are quantified until darker-skinned individuals get into the 'high' offices such as the American presidents, prejudices won't change.

Unless darker-skinned, hair kinked, fat lip, hip, thick, curved real-world' female images are featured in high-fashion mags on a significant scale, then such an image wont be one of glorified representation as much as other images are in this world...

I can go on an on as much as colorism is a quantified analysis that goes on like a river.


"My intention in writing what I did was not meant to be oppressive. It was an exploration of what Frantz Fanon wrote (Black Skin, White Mask). Indeed, there would be many that would dismiss his writings, but it can be very empowering to be critical of oneself and to engage in continuous self-assessment and refining of one’s ideas and actions. I made that post, so if anyone wants to come on the board and discuss it, I am open to that. The aim for me is to become more conscious of my thoughts, words and actions.  --Makini"

What you wrote (Mawd ting!!) is truly out there, and not touched on 'enough' compared to other aspects IMO. That conflict. However this kind of thing i don't understand...how can one become more conscious? Like wanting more juice while drinking it...i don't get that...can self-assessment be complete (in relation to colorism)? if its like trying to 'know it all'...there's something subtle about that.



Guidance
diyouth
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Makini
Makini
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« Reply #24 on: May 17, 2012, 02:30:24 PM »

The purpose of my initial post was to explain why I think it is important to rationalize issues. Through understanding and expressing one can effect change. Even some who benefit from Colorism can become more considerate of others when they understand the issue.

If people change without an understanding of their previous position, their change is not necessarily for the better and they can easily revert to their prior situation.

People do experience things without understanding them. To understand means to “perceive the significance, explanation, or cause of (something)”. People are free to express themselves in many ways but if they want others to understand them then they have to communicate in ways that others can understand.

Colorism needs to be discussed more.

I will leave the rest of your contribution for others who can follow it, or wish to engage it.
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diyouth
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« Reply #25 on: May 17, 2012, 09:28:21 PM »

Makini,

Colorism in advertising
by A. Bruce Crawley
http://www.phillytrib.com/commentaryarticles/item/3887-colorism-in-advertising.html

The above article touches on all what you an others have mentioned.
Especially the Importance of understanding colorism!

Not only for us but apparently for advertising agencies as well.
The article points that it makes sense for an advertising agency after understanding and knowing colorism, to put lighter-skinned models in their ads, because
even most people including darker-skinned individuals perfer the 'lighter'-complexions.
(35% in Preturia South Africa, 52% in Dakar Senegal,  77% in Lagos, Nigeria...)

Not devaluing the importance of understanding colorism.
Highlighting factors 'outside' colorism, that if unchallenged,
colorism doesn't even begin to cease. The focus on understanding colorism alone is repetitive/stagnant.


The writer concludes article:

"Before we get mad at Acura’s ad agency, before we set out to bring “justice” to the entire advertising agency business, maybe we should work on bringing common sense, self-pride and economic self-determination to our own community. --A. Bruce Crawley"


"Colorism needs to be discussed more.
I will leave the rest of your contribution for others who can follow it, or wish to engage it.--Makini"


...so these or my contributions is not discussing colorism......seemingly people only engage their interests...bless



Guidance
diyouth
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Zaynab
Zainab
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« Reply #26 on: May 19, 2012, 05:38:23 PM »

Diyouth,
The author of the aforementioned article( Bruce Crawley) was not disputing the fact that colorism is an issue. But was instead 'shedding light' on how colorism is perpetuated (still) within many job fields, with focus on the media industry. If you are of one view then it is quite easy to distort the general tone and intention of this article. He at no time endorsed nor claimed the perpetrators had any understanding of colorism.

"Before we get mad at Acura’s ad agency, before we set out to bring “justice” to the entire advertising agency business, maybe we should work on bringing common sense, self-pride and economic self-determination to our own community." (Bruce Crawley)


In this statement, following the general tone of the article, it is quite evident that the writer holds generally the same view as some others on this site. That is, the best way to start to fight colorism is by making ourselves aware of its existence.  In that, let us deliver our community out of their state of sleep or ignorance. It will not dis-continue by fighting the companies that endorse Colorism.

"Not devaluing the importance of understanding colorism.
Highlighting factors 'outside' colorism, that if unchallenged,
colorism doesn't even begin to cease. The focus on understanding colorism alone is repetitive/stagnant."


I would appreciate a general idea of what you think/believe are factors "outside" of Colorism that should be considered.
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diyouth
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« Reply #27 on: May 22, 2012, 07:32:03 AM »

Zainab,


"The author of the aforementioned article( Bruce Crawley) was not disputing the fact that colorism is an issue. But was instead 'shedding light' on how colorism is perpetuated (still) within many job fields, with focus on the media industry....

...In this statement, following the general tone of the article, it is quite evident that the writer holds generally the same view as some others on this site.--Zainab"


Why would you say these things to me when my post you quoted the article from states:

"The above article touches on all what you an others have mentioned.
Especially the Importance of understanding colorism! --diyouth"



"If you are of one view then it is quite easy to distort the general tone and intention of this article. He at no time endorsed nor claimed the perpetrators had any understanding of colorism--Zainab"

...accusing me of distorting???

I quote:
"So — maybe Acura’s ad agency was not being racist, at all. Maybe their agency’s creative people had simply done their homework and found that Americans — even African Americans — still feel less positively disposed to darker-skinned Black people than to light-skinned black people. --A. Bruce Crawley"

What does this mean: "Maybe their agency's creative people had simply done their homework..."


Do you know the depths of research that is involved in marketing and advertising. Are you, aware of the demand TO know an understand audience/consumers? .
If you know that darker-skinned blacks buy into lighter, feeling less positively disposed to darker-skinned blacks, why would your company advert include darker-skinned blacks; especially from a researched, assessed, analyzed, educated, economical, profitable, informed standpoint?


"I would appreciate a general idea of what you think/believe are factors "outside" of Colorism that should be considered.--Zainab"

Remember the context and what you said to me:
"Dont say what you think, what did you learn? --Zainab"

So I don't 'think' you'd really appreciate my thoughts or beliefs. So Lets be realistic, that even a child can understand, because we need them to!

You see and hear bad things about dark-skinned called colorism.
As to understand colorism is to understand something that's bad relating to darker-skin.

(outside factor)
If you see and hear good things about the darker-skin, it couldn't be called colorism!
Because to understand this is to understand something good relating to the darker-skin.

It is clear, even when you search the internet via  key word "colorism",
information even in discussions have no mention of the "good" relating to the darker-skin.
How beauty permeates darker-skin...hardly if any mention at all!!!
So how can change even begin, by engaging that analytical, intellectualized/rationalized awareness such as colorism?(my point all along)

Like some who speak of black history starting from slavery mostly mentioning the oppression, struggle, inadvertedly suggesting that black history has little or no 'glory'.

Yet me highlighting this is seen as trying to make colorism a none issue; something that shouldn't be discussed. I can only assume that's the reason why you and Makini have engaged my posts. (this speaks of something else that i may not get into here)

The authors last words in the article...
"How can we expect others to respect us and our dark skins, if we, ourselves, don’t? --A. Bruce Crawley"

Not to be insulting or condescending, i ask...
How can being informed of how one is and has been victimized, respecting yourself?
especially when that information, under the banner colorism,
doesn't include the 'reasons' for respect, admiration, beauty of darker-skinned individuals deserving.






Guidance
diyouth




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fierytrini
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« Reply #28 on: May 22, 2012, 05:51:48 PM »

http://shadeism.com/

Quote
This documentary short is an introduction to the issue of shadeism, discrimination that exists between the lighter-skinned and darker-skinned members of the same community...Through the eyes and words of 5 young womyn and 1 little girl - all females of colour - the film takes us into the thoughts and experiences of each. Overall, 'Shadeism' explores where shadeism comes from, how it directly affects us as womyn of colour, and ultimately, begins to explore how we can move forward through dialogue and discussion.


The film chronicles the experience of two East Indian girls, two Caribbean and one African and the niece of one girl. All the women live in Canada. These are 5 undergraduate students addressing Colorism as it pertains to their family and culture. What is particularly fascinating is how the four year old already sees that something is "wrong" about her skin tone.

In the first few minutes of the opening, those lines by the narrator ring true to me.
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Zaynab
Zainab
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« Reply #29 on: May 24, 2012, 01:10:44 AM »

Diyouth,
I write what I understand to be true. And to answer your initial question, if the general idea for which something was written is not taken as it was intended, then it is perhaps taken out of context.

Why would you say these things to me when my post you quoted the article from states:
"The above article touches on all what you and others have mentioned.
Especially the Importance of understanding colorism! --diyouth"


The article did not touch on the importance of understanding colorism. The article focused more on Colorism Awareness and how it is used in advertising and in the advertising industry.

"Do you know the depths of research that is involved in marketing and advertising. Are you, aware of the demand TO know an understand audience/consumers? .
If you know that darker-skinned blacks buy into lighter, feeling less positively disposed to darker-skinned blacks, why would your company advert include darker-skinned blacks; especially from a researched, assessed, analyzed, educated, economical, profitable, informed standpoint?"


You give these ad executives too much credit. I believe that yes, they do research, but not to the depths you are relating. They do not delve into the psyche of their research subjects. You throw around the words 'informed', 'understand' and 'know' loosely. There is nothing informed about research done for the basis of advertising. If these companies did/do understand colorism as you professed, then they would be easily aware of the negative effects of perpetuating this. However, people are rarely aware of the domino effect that persists, in engaging an issue when they are not WELL informed.

What does this mean: "Maybe their agency's creative people had simply done their homework..."

That is just a figure of speech. It can be interpreted countless ways depending  on my/your own perception of the context to which it is used. In this context, it simply implies that the ad agencies are aware of colorism, its general acceptance. They are aware that both white and blacks prefer a lighter shade of black to endorse their products. If a lighter skin is selling it, then they are generally more likely to purchase it. So, yes. They are aware of that so they did do their homework.

Doing their homework in this instance means, viewing surveys/research etc. done in black, white, mixed race communities/colleges which conclude that lighter skin/complexion is preferred. And individuals with these lighter shades of black stand a better chance of selling them something or encouraging them to part with their money. The purpose of an ad campaign is to generate revenue for companies. People go into business to make money. Most of them do not care about the well being of others.

"Remember the context and what you said to me":

Even my words are taken out of context. What I said to you previously, does not apply here/in this instance. I asked you a straight forward question. You could choose to answer it or not.

"You see and hear bad things about dark-skinned called colorism.
As to understand colorism is to understand something that's bad relating to darker-skin.
(outside factor)
If you see and hear good things about the darker-skin, it couldn't be called colorism!
Because to understand this is to understand something good relating to the darker-skin."


Colorism is not something bad about dark-skinned people. It is a problem that all races engage in, that is bad. It is a problem that all people have to address. It is among other things, the ill-treatment of dark-skinned people. This ill-treatment pursues them and persists regardless of whether these dark-skinned people do good. Regardless of how hard they work, their integrity etc., they are discriminated against on grounds they have no control over.  

"Yet me highlighting this is seen as trying to make colorism a none issue; something that shouldn't be discussed. I can only assume that's the reason why you and Makini have engaged my posts. (this speaks of something else that i may not get into here)"

Your comment here is perplexing. What are you trying to convey here?
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