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+  Africa Speaks Reasoning Forum
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| | |-+  The Mis-Education of the Negro
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Author Topic: The Mis-Education of the Negro  (Read 9306 times)
Kebo
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« on: June 01, 2004, 03:44:29 PM »

Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter G. Woodson

This book was written in 1933 but I think the message is still relevant. The title speaks for itself. Woodson explains how the education the American Negro receives is what enslaves the negro's mind, and prevents him from competing in the economic sphere and realizing his potential.

"Enslave a negro's mind and you don't have to worry about what he will do". Woodson explains how the negro's sense of inferiority and lack of achievement comes from education. And how his education keeps him in his place. And so negros actually went from one form of slavery into another. The education the negro receives is not really education, but is actually enslavement; the opposite of what its supopsed to be. True education teaches people to think, and teaching negros to think is something their education has not done.

Woodson is a negro who doesn't spend time pitying his race but instead gives out a message of learning to think for yourself and to do for yourself. To not be dependent on outside forces. Outside forces are doing for themselves and are not out to help others succeed. To succeed in making a living and lifting oneself from drudgery to a life of ease and comfort one must do for themselves, beginning with learning to think for oneself.

A great message. Real education originates in thinking for yourself, and by thinking for yourself you can do for yourself and by doing for yourself you exceed previous limitations and can build a real life for yourself and your people.

Kebo
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Mis-Education of the Negro by Carter G. Woodson
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African justice - white redemption
Kebo
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RastafariSpeaks .com


« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2004, 11:20:17 AM »


Since this book was written in 1933 I think African-americans have achieved success in thinking their way out of the white man's world. The message in this book had much meaning for myself. I see the destructive unproductive outcome or lack of outcome that comes from allowing others to make decisions for myself and waiting on others before I get up and think and do for myself.

After years of relying on others the self-mind deadens, and loses its way. The abilities to make decisions are confused and the identity of the self is like a question mark. Beginning to think for myself/oneself is the beginning of a resurrection. Asking myself questions like, what do I think about this and that, what's my opinion, what's my assessment, how would I describe that, how can I figure this puzzle out on my own. Become independent in thought and self-reliant in action.

I believe that the mind can re-train itself, work itself off of dependence and achieve an independent status, and mind-frame. At the same time there is doubt about breaking patterns that have been ingrained for so long. And I ask myself how can I/one break mental chains that have been on for so long. I don't even know what its like to think!! Then again the answer should come from my head.

Kebo
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African justice - white redemption
Ayinde
Ayinde
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« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2004, 04:13:24 PM »

Quote
Since this book was written in 1933 I think African-americans have achieved success in thinking their way out of the white man's world.

Some African Americans have been able to understand the system to some degree, but most have not been able to think their way out of it.

I will add that the racist system have also damaged whites, most of whom are unable to relate to people of other cultures, and by extension nature in general. But it is up to whites to look at these issues and see that it also relates to them.

When the majority of Blacks in the U.S. can attain their legitimate goals without being blocked by the racist attitudes of others, then we can generalize and say that African-Americans have achieved success in thinking their way out of the white man's world-view.
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Kebo
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« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2004, 10:15:12 AM »


I've got to believe that any man/woman can think their way out of slavery. From an individual to a race. The alternative is bleak.
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African justice - white redemption
Ayinde
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« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2004, 11:51:39 AM »

"...any man/woman can think their way out of slavery."

This part is true, in my opinion.
However, there is a difference between what people can do, and what they actually do. Increasing awareness is the start.

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