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25910 Posts in 9966 Topics by 982 Members Latest Member: - Ferguson Most online today: 85 (July 03, 2005, 06:25:30 PM)
+  Africa Speaks Reasoning Forum
|-+  SCIENCE, SOCIOLOGY, RELIGION
| |-+  Spirituality (Moderators: Tyehimba, leslie)
| | |-+  Have you ever been to a traditional ritual?
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Author Topic: Have you ever been to a traditional ritual?  (Read 37937 times)
OlOrisa_Olokun
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« on: July 08, 2004, 07:15:45 AM »

I see everyone is checking out my posts, but no responses. Lots of views but no input. I wondering if I am sharing what everyone already knows plenty about.

Here is the question. Is there anyone currently practicing a traditional african religion? Has anyone every attended a ritual or ceremony conducted by a traditional african religous community? If so, what deity/ancestor? If not, how come?

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Bantu_Kelani
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« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2004, 03:27:37 PM »

Don't be surprised to see few posters dealing with traditional African religions here. I believe few black visits this site. Not strangely enough whites and non-blacks have the most presence on this message board, and for the most part they are unable or unwilling to discuss traditional Africans religions.
Even our own people here, supposedly engaged in consciousness-raising with regard to African heritage, fail to recognize or even mention our traditional religions because of the trickery of Judeo-Christianity and brainwashing today, who want to keep Blacks in spiritual backwardness.

Personally, my faith is in my ancestors and believes Divinity is in all places, in all people, and in all situations where they should be. For myself, I feel NZAMBI-A MPUNGU (the Creator Source) in my blood. I feel it in the music drums.
It is my view that each path can lead to revelation and spiritual advancement if the aspirant truly seeks it. An uninitiated person no needs to attend ceremonies in a tradition African house. From the outside they can learn the ways of traditional religions. With books, the Internet and its vast resources the ceremonies of traditional African spirituality are no longer hidden. However, as one prepares for the grade of priest, of course the candidate will require spending requisite nights and days within the inner temple to sleep alongside with the spirits to gain the hidden knowledge of the cycles of Nature to become a shaman-healer.

I am from the Republic of the Congo, so as a uninitiated  I practice Kongo or Bantú religion non-disrespect to the Orisha. I have incorporated the Congo religion with Dahomey Vodun however. There are no traditional African houses in my town, so I practice Kongo religion and Dahomey Vodou myself, safely and comfortably at home. Like the Orishas of Yoruban tradition, trough trance  or posssession we call the powers in nature and the ancestors to bring down wisdom and provide spiritual assistance in the body of the faithful. As a people of central Africa we believe in NKISI (magick). We believe in Nkisi, which is the focusing of the energies of the mind, animal, plant or mineral to direct these energies around and within us and send theses energies using the power of WILL for healing and growth.

I place a great emphasis on the principle of unconditional love, goodness and justice, as well as the principles of intelligence, pioneering and power. So, ultimately OGUN -Spirit of Iron and EZILI -Spirit of Love rules my psyche and my feelings. I designed my altar to empower these energies in my home and within me. I also give respect, sacrifice and worship to the spirit of the EARTH in Kongo called KALUNGA.

B.K
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OlOrisa_Olokun
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« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2004, 08:06:56 PM »

this site populated by mostly non-africans? wow. thats revealing.

i am familiar with both vodun, nkisi and some of the other spiritual forces you speak of.

i will say this: within orisa, akan, and even vodun as practiced here in the states there are many many ways for non-initiates to get involved. the akan have akom. the orisa folks have bembe. and the vodun equally have ceremony and participation for non-initiates.

its good to make your company. we will talk more.
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Bantu_Kelani
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« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2004, 04:54:49 AM »

Yes, it is always good to meet and converse with like minded people. I definitely appreciate your contributions to this forum.Grin.

Are you an American with Black blood in your ancestry or are you a pure Black African from the continent? With the colonial brainwashing prevalent among most our people, what led you to engage in the spiritual tradition of the ancient Africans and shamanism? In order for me to gain insight and knowledge, would you mind telling me what experience, what routes influenced you to recognize and return to your roots? Do you practice the Yoruba Ifa'Orisha tradition, the African Diaspora Vodou or perhaps a Kongo derived religion like Palo, Obeah or Candomblé? Are they all completely different systems? Are you a priest or an initiated person? Who are the beloved ancestors and deities you have chosen to concentrate and commune with? I look forward to reading your replies. Thank you very much in advance if you can.

B.K
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We should first show solidarity with each other. We are Africans. We are black. Our first priority is ourselves.
iyah360
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« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2004, 07:08:24 AM »

I do not comment because I am being quiet while the teachers speak. I do not know too much about these traditional religions - so it is best that I keep my mouth shut and learn.
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erzulie
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« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2004, 09:27:31 AM »

as a Haitian living the in the United States from a young age, my path towards the practice of Vodun has been marked by family silences, anguish, loss, forgetting, fear, suppression and shame. my mother assumes herself strictly roman catholic and while father practices he has been an irresponsible model. thus, though i am a daughter of Erzulie Danto and Papa Ogun, i have yet to initiate. i am still learning and growing. i have traveled home as well to Benin and Ghana to gain more knowledge of our traditions.

i give thanks for your offerings to the site and will continue to read them. spiritual movement for me is a very personal journey and though i continue to seek community and guidance, i have unfortunately exerienced and witnessed misuse of power and sexual manipulation from so called teachers/hougans. that is the unfortunate ugly side of Haiti's powerful legacy of Vodun as it has been mutilated by white supremacy and capitalist patriarchy. thus i remain careful of sharing my spirit. still i continue to seek my spiritual family as i learn more and honor the loa and my ancestors at home and at selected ceremonies.
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OlOrisa_Olokun
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« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2004, 04:55:30 PM »

Quote
Yes, it is always good to meet and converse with like minded people. I definitely appreciate your contributions to this forum.Grin.

Are you an American with Black blood in your ancestry or are you a pure Black African from the continent? With the colonial brainwashing prevalent among most our people, what led you to engage in the spiritual tradition of the ancient Africans and shamanism? In order for me to gain insight and knowledge, would you mind telling me what experience, what routes influenced you to recognize and return to your roots? Do you practice the Yoruba Ifa'Orisha tradition, the African Diaspora Vodou or perhaps a Kongo derived religion like Palo, Obeah or Candomblé? Are they all completely different systems? Are you a priest or an initiated person? Who are the beloved ancestors and deities you have chosen to concentrate and commune with? I look forward to reading your replies. Thank you very much in advance if you can.

B.K


i am born in america. but i would die before i would use the term american to describe myself, as it is situation of fate, not choice or compliance. i am an diasporan african, as i would suppose you are a continental african. (?)

i am a devotee of Orisa'Ifa - for the last 14 years. Palo is available, but I don not practice it. There are all completely but complementary situations.

I am omo Olokun, a child of Olokun. I am in my first year of priesthood.

I am driven to practice the Old Ways because of my ancestors. They direct it. I listen.  Wink Many many diasporan african hear, but ignore - many many diasporan african are so busy listening to other things that their minds are too clouded or too afraid to heed the call as well.
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When we have the determination to restrain our lower desires, the door is opened for us to fulfill our highest aspirations.
OlOrisa_Olokun
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« Reply #7 on: August 11, 2004, 07:07:03 AM »

Quote
I do not comment because I am being quiet while the teachers speak. I do not know too much about these traditional religions - so it is best that I keep my mouth shut and learn.


no. its not best to keep your mouth shut. its best to start asking questions or posting comments. or those of us that have a perspective will simply stop using this forum because we assume no one is interested.
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When we have the determination to restrain our lower desires, the door is opened for us to fulfill our highest aspirations.
Oshun_Auset
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« Reply #8 on: August 11, 2004, 09:20:30 AM »

Alafia iyawo_olokun,

I am a follower of Ifa currently but have been advised spiritually(very recently) that my true path should be that of Dahomey(Voudun). But as you have stated they are different but complimentary systems...and many times combined in the West.

I used to practice and study with the Ausar Auset society.

My spiritual journey started when I was very young, trying to see through the lies of Christian capitalism apologists and white supremacy. I worked in reverse. I studied the foundations of Judaism(Black Hebrews), Christianity,(Orthodox and Gnostic) and Islam,(N.O.I.) and therfore found myself in the Kemetic practices for several years. I then began a political journey into Pan-Africanism and started to learn and come into contact with the diverse yet highly similar traditional practices outside of Kemetic teachings. This was a logical and conscious step on my part. I asked myslef "Why aren't the practices of my West African Ancestors what I am practicing?"

Although I have great respect for all indigenous African religions, I find a lot of us African centered folk born in the West do what I refer to as "being stuck in KMT land"...This is largely in response to the fact that most of the western secret societies, Judeo-Christianity and Islam, and Greek philosophies are copied/stolen from Kemetic teachings, and that simultaneousely KMT is always removed from Africa and falsley labelled a meditaranian/non-African/White civilization by the Euro-centric education/indoctrination system.  I have come to the realization(with the guidance of my ancestors) that concetrating on KMT because of the European obsession or thievery and subsequent warping of it is harmful to us to a certain degree. It causes us to not get back to what we were before being enslaved...our direct ancestors came largely from the West Africa not the East, and their practices are what I lost and need to reclaim.

I have attended many traditional ceremonies but am not yet an initiate because in my local area the Ifa community has been warped by capitalism and charges exorbidant amounts for initiation(and one of the priests is known to take advantage of young women)...much like the sister from Haiti was pointing out. I have been lucky enough to have a real spiritual advisor contact me via this site, and am looking forward to FINALLY being initiated... Grin

Keep posting sister, don't let the lack of response frustrate you. Much of the reason I haven't personally responded is because I was already familiar with the information, and the posts were presented in the form of information discemination, rather than a discussion format(like this post)...Like Kelani said, many of the posters on this site are unfamiliar with these spiritual practices or are disinterested for a number of reasons...that I won't go into...But I'm quite sure many African people read this site(I know several who read but don't post) and are enlightened by your posts...
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Forward to a united Africa!
OlOrisa_Olokun
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« Reply #9 on: August 11, 2004, 02:06:20 PM »

hey, i am man - not a woman! lol

if you are closing in on the word "iyawo" it means bride or initiate, that is a newly initiated priest. but men and women carry it alike as their name in their 1st year.

note: for every charlatan there is a genuine article. also, you dont need initiation to practice this system deeply. any that tells you that the only way to deepen your practice is through initiation is either (1)trying to get money (2) or simply doesnt know any significant ritual or spiritual sciences beyond the inititation rite. there many of other beautiful experiences that deepn your spiritual practice. i wish you must success in your spiritual journey as i read the thought and effort in your words.


hmm. i dont like to just post. i like to dialogue. lol we will see...
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When we have the determination to restrain our lower desires, the door is opened for us to fulfill our highest aspirations.
Oshun_Auset
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« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2004, 03:05:53 PM »

My bad....brother Grin
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Forward to a united Africa!
gman
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« Reply #11 on: September 06, 2004, 07:51:31 AM »

I've just seen this post. Probably you all would not consider Nyahbinghi to be a traditional African ritual, but rather as a re-creation based on memories of traditional African rituals. I participate in Binghis when I can. Every full moon some Guyanese idrens in Brazil would hold a Binghi on their farm, out under the moon. When drumming and chanting Nyahbinghi I feel a connection with JAH and the ancestors and spirits of the earth. I would love to participate and/or observe other rituals, but so far have not been invited to any and I would not invite myself. One thing is, I don't deal with blood sacrifice, I wonder how essential you all feel that is to traditional African spirituality. It's my understanding that there are Rastas in T&T who also practice Shango (Trini version of Ifa/Vodun/Santeria/Candomble) but offer fruits, flowers and vegetables instead of animal blood. I don't like to kill animals, haven't eaten any flesh other than fish in 13 years, and I would like to cut out fish too. The teaching I get from the elders in GT, is that animals have the same right to life as we do, and I do agree with this. However this is not to condemn those who practice blood sacrifice and consider it absolutely essential.
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preach
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« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2004, 05:15:33 PM »

Very good question gman. Tradition, as defined by Oxford Dictionary American Edition, is a custom, opinion, or belief handed down to posterity; posterity is defined as all succeeding generations,2. descendants of a person, successors, heirs, children, offspring, issue. Knowing this should it be considered or is a Nyabinghi a traditional african ritual, or as gman put it and I paraphrase, just a derivative?
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Oshun_Auset
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« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2004, 10:57:41 AM »

Hope this helps...

Click on the number of each to get video, sound and further description

http://www.isop.ucla.edu/africa/yra/ayede/summary.html

(needs high bandwidth)
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Bantu_Kelani
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« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2004, 12:49:34 AM »

Gman,

In African traditional rituals, animal sacrifice is neither morbid nor inhumane. It's simply offering them sacred to the gods and the ancestors, and then sharing their energy (Ashe) in communal meals. Animal sacrifice is a central part of African indigenous culture. So it makes little sense to critic this practice when one decide to become religiously involved with the depth of African indigenous cultures.

B.K
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We should first show solidarity with each other. We are Africans. We are black. Our first priority is ourselves.
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