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25910 Posts in 9966 Topics by 982 Members Latest Member: - Ferguson Most online today: 85 (July 03, 2005, 06:25:30 PM)
+  Africa Speaks Reasoning Forum
|-+  SCIENCE, SOCIOLOGY, RELIGION
| |-+  Spirituality (Moderators: Tyehimba, leslie)
| | |-+  KWANZAA
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Author Topic: KWANZAA  (Read 15804 times)
Bantu_Kelani
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« on: December 13, 2004, 04:36:09 AM »

KWANZAA!!



 

Black brothers and sisters don't forget to replace Christmas with Kwanzaa! A holiday that was created for us, by us. Hotep!

B.K
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We should first show solidarity with each other. We are Africans. We are black. Our first priority is ourselves.
preach
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« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2004, 09:24:56 AM »

Respect. In my workplace people ridicule me for not participating in their grab bag. I am unmoved. Hotep!
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love
QueenJahzara
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« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2004, 08:13:17 AM »

Ashe!!!! Two Thumbs
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Poetic_Princess
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I am nothing with out my soul


« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2004, 09:46:13 PM »

Much Respects and Blessings to one all and Happy Kwanzaa
As this being the first year for me celebrating Kwanzaa i would like to share the meanings of the seven candles and some history about Kwanzaa with everyone for those who know what the candles represent and for those who dont know but are very curious about it.In my homeland Barbados Kwanzaa is becoming more important and more activites are planned since many people are realizing where they came from and their african roots.Happy Kwanzaa Everyone!


KWANZAA Is the first non-heroic African American holiday ever to come Into existence. Blacks, from every phase of life in the United States, have been practicing this holiday since 1966. This warm, social, holiday where people gather to reinforce each other's spirit and friendship was founded by Professor Maulana Karenga.

Celebration of this holiday lasts for seven days from December 26 to January 1. Gifts aren't mandatory when celebrating KWANZAA. When they are given, they are given mainly to children on the basis of merit.

The name KWANZAA is derived from the Swahili word. "Kwanza" which means first and comes from the saying mantunda yo kwanza "first fruits." The extra "a" represents the African-American values. KWANZAA is a holiday where Blacks acknowledge their African roots while at the same time remind themselves of their goals as a people.

It is a holiday based on the African celebration of the "first fruits harvest" which comes at the end of their year, and KWANZAA lasts seven days to promote the seven basic principles honored during this holiday.

According to KWANZAA: Origin, Concepts. Practice by Ron Karenga. the seven principles are: (1) UMOJA (Unity). a commitment to the practice of togetherness both within the family and in our communities; (2) KUJICHAGULIA (Self Determination) is the interest of developing and patterning our lives and images after ourselves instead of having it done for us, (3) UJIMA (Collective Work and Responsibility) which means working together on matters of common Interest; (4) UJAMAA (Cooperative Economics) which is the habit of sharing our wealth and resources; (5) NIA (Purpose) building and developing our national community: (6) KUUMBA (Creativity) to inspire ourselves to keep developing new ways of expressing our music and art as well as being creative In our work and industrial pursuits; (7) IMANI (Faith) believing in ourselves as a people.

KWANZAA also has symbols which are mazao (crops). mkeka (mat). kinara (the candle holder), vibunzi (ears of corn), zawadi (gifts). kikombe cha umola (the unity cup) and mishumaa saba (the seven candles). Seven candles are placed in the candleholder, representing the principles. This is usually placed on the mat with the corn, gifts and unity cup around it.

At KWANZAA gatherings people usually bring fruit or food and share a meal and a smile. The unity cup is passed and people say positive things about Blacks and our future. Then the candles are lit, and something is said about each principle. After that people dance or talk, and just have a good time. There's a lot more to this holiday than superficial gift giving. It's a time to lift each other up and give thanks for being of a unique culture with a value all its own.

The harvest of the first fruits
A ritual based on age-old African celebrations, which traditionally took place near the end and beginning of each year. People gathered together to celebrate the harvest and rejoice in their communities' collective efforts.
Only nationally, non-heroic, African-American holiday born in the United States.
Kwanzaa symbols and much of its terminology have their roots in Africa; however, Kwanzaa was originally designed for African-Americans and remains a distinctly African-American ritual.
Dr. Maulana Karenga formulated the Kwanzaa celebration in 1966.
Kwanzaa begins December 26 (day after Christmas) and continues for seven days up to January 1st.
Kwanzaa helps African-Americans develop greater sense of unity, identity and purpose.
Kwanzaa is much more than a yearly ritual. It is in fact, a way of life, a workable formula for social, cultural and economic progress.
Kwanzaa is a time of rejoicing, reflection and commitment - shared by family and community.
It is not a religious celebration nor is it a substitute for Christmas. The fact that it begins the day after Christmas was an effort to avoid the excessive commercialization of the season.
Gift-giving is not an Important aspect of Kwanzaa, although gifts can be exchanged. Gifts are given on the basis of merit, not merely for the sake of giving.

http://www.ritesofpassage.org/kwanzaameaning.htm

Mishumaa, the practice of lighting one candle on each day of Kwanzaa
Each of the seven days of Kwanzaa represents one of the Nguzo Saba (Seven Principles),
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I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become reality.
Bantu_Kelani
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« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2004, 12:25:03 AM »

Thanks for exposing the membership here to the significance of Kwanzaa sister Poetic-Princess, be blessed Smiley !


!!!!

B.K
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We should first show solidarity with each other. We are Africans. We are black. Our first priority is ourselves.
preach
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« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2004, 07:11:04 AM »

Habari Gani!
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jemba
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YENGE BANTU


« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2005, 01:13:04 PM »

What dose the word kwanza mean and how did the festival get its name@ B.K
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Think Clear BE Clear>>>>Always Analyze never Dismiss We all are here to learn>>>>> this earth is a BIG class Room
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